Preparing for flu season

News

ILLINOIS (WCIA) — It’s something you’re about to start hearing a lot: Did you get your flu shot yet? With flu season approaching, doctors encourage people to get vaccinated.

Hospitals and pharmacies are preparing for the start of flu season. It usually begins to pick up in October and November, then peaks between December and February. It can also carry on well into spring.

Symptoms include fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath and body aches. Doctors say you should start getting flu shots before activity increases so your body has a couple weeks to build immunity.

“People can start getting them as young as six months of age. The people with the worst reactions to the flu are the very young and the very old.”

Christie Clinic Doctor Mitch Hammel explains why it’s so important for people to get the shot.

“The reason we do them is two-fold. One is to help prevent the illness in you, but also to help prevent the spread to others, so unless you’ve had a severe reaction to flu shots in the past or a severe reaction, getting a flu shot is a good idea.”

The CDC says last year’s flu season was the longest in the past decade. Doctors hope to get the word out early this season, so people don’t set a new flu record.

Last flu season, roughly 41.3 million showed flu symptoms with up to 19.4 million visiting a doctor and 610,000 hospitalized. The CDC estimates roughly 57,000 people, including 91 children, died from the flu and complications last season.

CENTRAL ILLINOIS (WCIA) — Doctors are urging people to prepare for this year’s flu season. Flu season typically begins to pick up in October and November, reaching its peak activity between December and February.

Doctors recommend getting flu shots before flu activity increases in your community, so your body has time to build immunity. They say anyone above the age of six-months-old should get a flu shot.

“The reason we do them is two-fold,” Christie Clinic’s Dr. Mitch Hammel explained. “One is to help prevent the illness in you, but also to help prevent the spread to others. So, unless you’ve had a severe reaction to flu shots in the past or a severe reaction, getting a flu shot is a good idea. They’ve proven that it helps to reduce missed work, but also helps to prevent giving the virus to those at-risk individuals who could have more severe reactions.”

Anyone can get a flu shot as long as they’re not allergic to eggs. Flu vaccines are covered by most insurance companies, but check with your provider before getting a shot.

Walk-in/Drive-thru Flu Clinics:
Christie Clinic, 1801 West Windsor Road, Champaign
Saturdays: September 21, October 5, November 9
7 am – Noon
Tuesdays: October 15, 22, November 5, 12, 19
9 am – 1 pm
Thursdays: October 17, 24, November 7, 14, 21, December 5
3 – 7 pm

Saturday, October 5, 7 am – Noon
Christie Clinic, 3545 North Vermilion Street, Danville
Christie Clinic, 1001 Commercial Drive, Mahomet
Christie Clinic, 209 West Borman Drive, Rantoul
Christie Clinic, 300 North Main, Tuscola

Carle Flu Clinic Dates:
Drive Through at North Annex
810 West Anthony Drive, Urbana
(directly off I-74 at exit 183)

September 28 & October 12, 9 am – 4 pm
September 29 & October 13, Noon – 4 pm

Weekends
October 19 – November 24
Saturdays: 9 am – 2 pm
Sundays: Noon – 4 pm

Tuesdays and Thursdays
October 15 – November 26
3 – 6 pm

Carle Mattoon on Hurst
October 16 & 17, 8:30 am – 5:30 pm

Carle Tuscola
October 12, 8:30 – 11 am
*Ages 5 and older​

Carle Danville on Fairchild
October 12, 8 am – 2 pm

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