Champaign, Ill. (WCIA)

You either love it or don’t. Raw, stuffed, dipped, salads, cooked, soups, stews, pot roast, tacos, drinks… the possibilities are endless. Lisa Lewey-Shields shares lots of great celery fun facts and recipes.

Celery Recipes

Enjoy the healthy benefits of celery by trying these recipes.

Cream of Celery Soup

Smooth and flavorful, this soup comes together quickly.

• 1/4 cup butter
• 1 small yellow onion, finely chopped
• 2 cups celery, finely chopped
• 1 large garlic clove, minced
• 1/3 cup flour
• 1 1/2 cup chicken stock
• 1 1/2 cup whole milk
• 1 tsp salt
• 1/2 tsp sugar
• 1/8 tsp
freshly ground black pepper

Melt butter over medium-high heat in a heavy-bottomed pot. Cook onions, celery, and garlic
until translucent, about five to seven minutes. Add flour and cook one minute.
Add chicken stock and milk, stirring until smooth. Increase heat, bringing mixture to a simmer.
Reduce heat to medium, adding remaining ingredients, and simmer uncovered for about 15
minutes. Add salt to taste.


Celery Salad with Horseradish and Celery Root

Simple but artful, this recipe brings interesting textures and flavors to the standard salad.
• 1 medium celery root
• 10 celery stalks, thinly sliced
• 1/2 cup celery leaves
• 1 shallot, thinly sliced into rings
• 1 tbsp lemon zest
• 1 tbsp prepared horseradish
• 1/2 cup olive oil
• 3 tbsp fresh lemon juice
• 1 cup flat-leaf parsley, packed
• salt
• fresh ground black pepper

Peel and halve celery root, then use a mandolin to thinly slice one half. Cut the other half into
matchsticks. Combine celery root with celery stalks, shallot, lemon zest, and horseradish.
Season with salt and pepper, then toss to combine. Allow to rest for about 10 minutes.
Meanwhile, whisk oil and lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper.
Drizzle over vegetables, then top with celery leaves and parley, tossing to combine.

Ants on a Log

This recipe puts a twist on the after-school staple. Keep it classic by substituting peanut butter
and raisins.
• 3 tbsp cream cheese
• 2 celery stalks, trimmed
• 1/4 cup assorted dried fruit
Spread cream cheese into the hollow side of each celery stalk and then sprinkle with dried fruit.

Creamy Celery Salad

Yield: 4 servings
Prep Time: 10 mins
Cook Time: 0 mins
Total Time: 10 mins
Celery salad is a gloriously simple salad recipe that’s got all the elements we love. Crunchy
celery, sweet bites of raisins, a scattering of walnuts, all wrapped up in a creamy dressing. It’s
delicious!
Ingredients:
8 stalks celery, sliced thin
¼ cup EACH: raisins, toasted walnuts, and minced red onion
3 tablespoons plain yogurt
2 tablespoons mayonnaise
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar, or 1 teaspoon white vinegar
½ teaspoon pepper
¼ teaspoon salt
For the rest of the recipe visit the website here: https://www.theendlessmeal.com/celery-salad/

Cancer Prevention

Celery is loaded with antioxidants. These include well-known varieties such as
flavonoids and vitamin C, as well as lunularin and bergapten. These and other
antioxidants help to prevent the oxidative stress that contributes to cancer.
Celery is rich in a phytochemical known as phthalides. This compound is thought to relax artery
wall tissues to promote healthy blood flow. This increased blood flow may lead to lower blood
pressure. Participants in a notable study involving celery seed extract experienced reductions in
both systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention and Treatment

Research suggests that a celery seed extract known as L-3-n-butylphthalide improves
both cognition and memory. This extract could play a valuable role in both treating
Alzheimer’s and preventing it from developing in the first place.

Nutrition

Celery contains high levels of several types of antioxidants, including flavonoids. These
fight free radicals to limit oxidative stress and could play a role in reducing the risk of
cancer.

Celery is also a good source of:
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
Vitamin K
Potassium
Folate

Nutrients per Serving
A cup of chopped celery contains:
Calories: 14
Protein: Less than 1 gram
Fat: Less than 1 gram
Carbohydrates: 3 grams
Fiber: 1.6 grams
Sugar: 1 gram
Eaten in excess, celery can cause bloating or gas in some people. These side effects
may stem from the vegetable’s high levels of the compound mannitol, which research
links to gastrointestinal problems.

How to Prepare Celery

Celery can be found at grocery stores, co-ops, and farmer’s markets. While it is easy to
grow, many people believe this vegetable is best left to experienced gardeners, as it
has specific needs for watering and soil quality. With proper care, however, it can
produce a bumper crop.

When selecting celery, look for tightly packed stalks that are crisp enough to snap off
with minimal effort. These should have a pale green color. Avoid stalks with wilted
leaves.

Celery is best stored in your refrigerator’s crisper drawer. Wrap it in foil or place in a
plastic bag. If stored properly, it can keep for up to two weeks in the fridge. Otherwise,
it can also be frozen for long-term storage.

A variety of food preparation methods can be used to produce an excellent celery-based
meal or snack. The vegetable has long been a favorite option for eating raw —
especially with dip. Otherwise, it can also be boiled, blanched, or steamed. Keep in
mind, however, that boiling and blanching celery dramatically reduces its phenolic
antioxidant content. Steaming does not have a significant impact on antioxidant activity.

Try these options for including celery in your diet:

  • Dip slices of celery in hummus.
  • Top with peanut butter and raisins.
  • Add chopped celery to tuna salad.
  • Stir fry celery slices with red chilis for extra spice.
  • Simmer with carrots and onion in chicken noodle soup.
  • Blend in a green smoothie with spinach, banana, and apple.
  • Stuff stalks with pimento cheese.
  • Spread cream cheese on celery stalks and sprinkle with bacon bits.
  • Add crushed tomatoes, baby carrots, ginger, and garlic to a roast in the slow cooker.
  • Include with a bloody Mary or spiced tomato juice for a virgin bloody Mary.

5 Healthy Benefits of Adding Celery to Your Diet

Celery reduces inflammation.
Chronic inflammation has been linked to many illnesses, including arthritis and osteoporosis.
Celery and celery seeds have approximately 25 anti-inflammatory compounds that can offer
protection against inflammation in the body.

Celery supports digestion.
While its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients offer protection to the entire digestive
tract, celery may offer special benefits to the stomach.
Pectin-based polysaccharides in celery, including a compound known as apiuman, have been
shown to decrease instances of stomach ulcers, improve the lining of the stomach, and modulate
stomach secretions in animal studies.
And then there’s the high-water content of celery — almost 95 percent — plus generous amounts
of soluble and insoluble fiber. All of those support a healthy digestive tract and keep you regular.
One cup of celery sticks has 5 grams of dietary fiber.

Celery is rich in vitamins and minerals with a low glycemic index.
You’ll enjoy vitamins A, K, and C, plus minerals like potassium and folate when you eat celery.
It’s also low in sodium. Plus, it’s low on the glycemic index, meaning it has a slow, steady effect
on your blood sugar.

Celery has an alkalizing effect.
With minerals like magnesium, iron, and sodium, celery can have a neutralizing effect on acidic
foods — not to mention the fact that these minerals are necessary for essential bodily functions.

Nutritional profile
Celery contains almost 95% water with a welcome dose of vitamins, minerals and fibres.
Nevertheless, celery is a good source of vitamin K, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, folate, potassium and
calcium. It also contains a minimal amount of protein, fat and just 1.4g of carbohydrates. Celery
is rich in useful antioxidants, phytonutrients and flavonoids.

Celery is a great source of important antioxidants.
Antioxidants protect cells, blood vessels, and organs from oxidative damage.
Celery contains vitamin C, beta carotene, and flavonoids, but there are at least 12 additional
kinds of antioxidant nutrients found in a single stalk. It’s also a wonderful source of
phytonutrients, which have been shown to reduce instances of inflammation in the digestive
tract, cells, blood vessels, and organs.

Celery reduces inflammation.
Chronic inflammation has been linked to many illnesses, including arthritis and osteoporosis.
Celery and celery seeds have approximately 25 anti-inflammatory compounds that can offer
protection against inflammation in the body.

Celery supports digestion.
While its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients offer protection to the entire digestive
tract, celery may offer special benefits to the stomach.
Pectin-based polysaccharides in celery, including a compound known as apiuman, have been
shown to decrease instances of stomach ulcers, improve the lining of the stomach, and modulate
stomach secretions in animal studies.
And then there’s the high-water content of celery — almost 95 percent — plus generous amounts
of soluble and insoluble fiber. All of those support a healthy digestive tract and keep you regular.
One cup of celery sticks has 5 grams of dietary fiber.

Celery is rich in vitamins and minerals with a low glycemic index.
You’ll enjoy vitamins A, K, and C, plus minerals like potassium and folate when you eat celery.
It’s also low in sodium. Plus, it’s low on the glycemic index, meaning it has a slow, steady effect
on your blood sugar.

Celery has an alkalizing effect.
With minerals like magnesium, iron, and sodium, celery can have a neutralizing effect on acidic
foods — not to mention the fact that these minerals are necessary for essential bodily functions.
Nutritional profile
Celery contains almost 95% water with a welcome dose of vitamins, minerals and fibres.
Nevertheless, celery is a good source of vitamin K, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, folate, potassium and
calcium. It also contains a minimal amount of protein, fat and just 1.4g of carbohydrates. Celery
is rich in useful antioxidants, phytonutrients and flavonoids.